Meditation Offerings

Meditation At Be Yoga and Wellness Mondays at 7 pm,
Any Time Fitness, Okaville Tuesdays at 7:15 pm.

Friday, October 16, 2015

Equanimity doesn't mean inaction

Buddha's concept of equanimity which arises after true understanding of impermanence is often misunderstood as a call to a fatalistic attitude of inaction. Far from it, a deeper understanding can lead to positive and fruitful action and a meaningful prosperous life.

Suffering is at the heart of most seeking. Let's begin at something that touches many hearts such as anger or disappointment for being rejected by a lover, an employer, parent or a friend. Suppose you have been turned down for a promotion or worse, being terminated. The reaction is anger and deep disappointment. Understanding the entire process is the key to accept this event as just another in a series of impermanent events that defines life.

Even if this hardship was the result of a personal vendetta or an aggressive act against you, anger is still a reaction based on ignorance. Ignorance of the fact that loss of this opportunity is a significant event. Ignorance of the fact that there is a unique, separate person called you who has suffered. Ignorance of the fact there is a unique individual laying this attack upon you. None of this is true.

Anger is a reaction of the body conditioned over millions of years to view rejection as a threat against its well being. This may be true but suffering by taking it as a permanent event is a delusional ignorance.

Buddha doesn't teach that you treat such events as irrelevant but reaction to that event as ignorance. Once you have internalized the impermanence of this or any other suffering, you release the body and mind to find the most effective means to make amends. And jump into action without delay and depression. 

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Who to follow; Buddha or Krishna?

Buddha says you can never be happy unless you wish happiness to everyone or meta love and kindness to all. Krishna says to Arjun , fire that arrow as it is your destiny and karma to kill your cousins.

Who should you follow? Can a 2015 human being making a living in business, arts or sciences, function by either of these principles? Can he simply be loving and kind to all even in face of great challenges and clearly adverse oppositions? Or does he ignore Budhdha's compassion and shoot the arrow at the heart of his adversity?

Is there a way out of this seemingly conflicting ways to be?

I can only find oneness as the answer. Only when you truly internalize that ALL matter that you sense  is interconnected, has been so since the Big Bang and perhaps even before, the answer will come to you. Whether you shoot the arrow or not, the target will one day perish was Krishna's point. If you don't shoot the arrow now, evil remains and perhaps create more hate and misery than before. Is that love and compassion? Or is it a selfish action with no compassion for others? You have to be sure before taking the shot.

Most of Budhdha's words were aimed at ending suffering of the individual. And that is only possible if you TRULY have compassion for others not just yourself. It is not possible for you to end your suffering if you do not wish others' happiness as well. This has to be an honest wish backed up by honest actions.